Overview Varicose Veins & Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI)

More than 30 million Americans suffer from varicose veins and the more serious form of venous disease called Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI), yet only 1.9 million seek treatment each year (1,2,3). If the disease is left untreated, varicose veins can progress to become CVI with symptoms that worsen over time. Fortunately, diagnosing and treating this disease early can halt its progression.

At the Cardio Metabolic Institute, we conduct in house procedures to treat CVI. See the treatment page for more details on the exact methodology, and call our office at 732-846-7000 for more information or to schedule a consultation.


 What are Varicose Veins?

Varicose veins are enlarged veins that can be blue, red or flesh colored. They are often raised above the skin on legs and look like twisted, bulging cords. They can also be associated with pain, aches, heaviness, restless legs, or burning and itching of the skin.


 What is Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI)?

Chronic Venous Insufficiency (CVI) is a progressive medical condition that may worsen over time. As varicose veins progress to become CVI, other painful symptoms like leg swelling, skin damage and ulcers may occur. (4,5) There are a number of factors that contribute to varicose veins and CVI, including pregnancy and heredity. (4)

Chronic Venous Insufficiency results in different physical changes on one’s legs. Below is a depiction of the possible changes that can occur:

Take our self assessment survey to see whether you may have CVI and qualify for treatment!


 References:

  1. LurieF, Creton D, Eklof B, Kabnick LS, Kistner RL, Pichot O, et al. Prospective randomized study of endovenous radiofrequency obliteration. (Closure procedure) versus ligation and stripping in aselected patient population (EVOLVeS Study). J Vasc Surg 2003;38;2:207-14
  2. Hinchliffe RJ, et al. A prospective randomised controlled trial of VNUS Closure versus Surgery for the treatment of recurrent long saphenous variscose veins. Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg 2006 Feb;31;2:212-218
  3. Almeida JI, Kaufman J, Göckeritz O, et al. Radiofrequency endovenous ClosureFast versus laser ablation for the treatment of great saphenous reflux: a multicenter, single-blinded, randomized study (RECOVERY Study). J Vasc Interv Radiol. 2009;20:752-759.
  4. L. H. Rasmussen, M. Lawaetz, L. Bjoern, B. Vennits, A. Blemings and B. Eklof, Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Endovenous Laser Ablation, Radiofrequency Ablation, Foam Sclerotherapy and Surgical Stripping for Great Saphenous Varicose Veins. British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd., Wiley Online Library, www.bjs.co.uk, March 15, 2011.
  5. Proebstle T. et al. Three-year European follow-up of endovenous radiofrequency-powered segmental thermal ablation of the great saphenous vein with or without treatment of calf varicosities. JVS; July2011.